Granted, we’re biased. We think EVERY season is a good time to visit Alaska!

Our summer season is May through September. This is a great time to be outdoors. Take a hike along a forest trail, fish for salmon in flowing blue rivers, kayak along secluded shorelines, look for Alaska’s Big 5 (moose, bear, wolves, caribou, and Dall sheep), or just have fun under the Midnight Sun. With our longer days, you’ll have plenty of daylight to play from dawn till dusk! 

Winter is roughly October -April. Snow may start falling in the Arctic and Interior regions in October, and by November in Southcentral. It’s time to get out and enjoy Alaska’s winter wonderland! Our nights are longer, but the low-level daylight – and moonlight reflecting on snow – are absolutely magical. Grab your snowshoes or cross-country skis and get out on the trails, snowmobile (snowmachine, as Alaskans call it) out to a remote cabin, or snuggle up in a sled behind a team of Alaska huskies as they mush their way across a brilliant white landscape. Speaking of dog mushing—it’s Alaska’s state sport! From 25-mile sprints to thousand-mile long-distance runs, Alaska’s premier four-footed athletes compete in races across the state. Once a necessary means for winter travel, sled dog racing is popular sport for humans and canines alike.  

If you want to see the aurora borealis - the northern lights - you’ll want to be Alaska from August through April, when it’s darkest. While potentially visible as far south as Ketchikan, the greens and reds of the northern lights are typically most visible in Interior and Arctic Alaska. Plan on dressing warm and staying up late: the best times to gaze into the night sky are between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m. when there is little or no moonlight.

Alaska Tips

Daylight

Learn More "Land of the Midnight Sun" isn't just a clever term. Summers in the Interior can have up to 24 hours of daylight. Sometimes visitors can have a problem adjusting to...

Culture

Learn More The Arctic region of Alaska encompasses the communities of Nome, Kotzebue and Utqiagvik (Barrow). North of the Arctic Circle, these towns offer cultural attractions that are closely tied to the...

Public Transportation

Learn More Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau and Ketchikan operate public transportation systems.

Sportfishing

Learn More Southcentral's coastal communities cater to the saltwater fishing enthusiast with all kinds of salmon and the famous Alaska halibut. Freshwater anglers can catch the salmon as they head up the...

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